Monthly Archives: February 2016

Silk Thread – The Ramble

Written by : Posted on February 22, 2016 : No Comments

Silk Thread: the love affair, the size chart, & too much on tipping….

We love silk thread the way we love agates.  You should, too.  It’s the sort of polyvalent affair that allows you to explore entire gamuts of color, and several dimensions, while doing no harm.  Not sure what color you should use?  Grab several colors.  Better yet, pick up a color chart and study those colors in daylight.   You don’t like the color you chose?  Strip it off.  One of silk’s greatest benefits is that, as top shelf components go, it’s inexpensive.  Typically in the range of $6.00/spool, you can buy a few spools and decide only to use one.  Save the others, or share them with other rodmakers.  Because colors of silk, even entire ranges of silks, come and go over time, it’s always worth having a few choice spools in your stash.  Dragons hoard gold.  The Beowulf Poet had his word hoard.  Rodmakers should have a hoard of silks.  If you become a monogamist among threads, then it is wise to stock up.  Speaking personally, I have a lifetime supply of Pearsall’s Classic Chestnut in Gossamer.  Good luck prying that from my hands while I’m still sentient.

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We’re on Instagram!

Written by : Posted on February 22, 2016 : No Comments

We're on Instagram

We’ll be posting pictures of cool rods and applications of our stuff and new components, and… who knows?

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The Longest Post Ever on Antique Guides

Written by : Posted on February 17, 2016 : No Comments

antique-guidesAs much a curse as it is a blessing, Golden Witch may own the largest collection of European-made vintage guides in the world.

It’s a blessing because vintage guide sales comprise a small but steady bit of background income, because rummaging through these classic components informs and inspires our own guide making efforts, because we can sometimes help a restorationist find that one, utterly obscure guide that they need to perfectly restore a rod using an appropriate, vintage, new old stock (NOS) piece of componentry. It’s a curse because the collection is massive – it takes up an immense amount of valuable warehouse shelving space; it is unwieldy – the boxes are heavy – and partially disorganized – there are boxes that have been opened once, then never opened again once they were sorted into the wire-guide group as opposed to the agate & agatine group; and because it bears a weight of obligation: when a maker or restorationist needs a guide, someone in the shop, usually me, spends time looking through the bins, measuring instruments in hand, trying to find a part of the style and size requisite to the project at hand.

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